Calorie counts on menus in Dubai deferred.

July 22nd, 2019 by Stephen Jones Leave a reply »

Khalid Mohammad Sherif Al Awadhi, CEO of the environment, health and safety control sector at Dubai Municipality recently said that displaying calories in menus will be optional for next two years and that the Municipality decided to postpone the implementation of the rule,, “to allow enough time for the industry to prepare itself.”The Food Safety Department will continue to encourage food establishments to declare calorie content.

(In May it was announced that restaurants, cafeterias and cafes with more than five branches were expected to mandatorily display the caloric value of each and every food item from November this year. All other restaurants, catering establishments and hotels were given the deadline of January 2020 to implement the rule).

A similar postponement happened in the USA ( part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act) due to industry lobbying. For example grocery store and convenience store industries argued that the rules didn’t take into consideration the vast differences between how the various types of affected establishments operate (think fast-food restaurants versus pizza delivery chains versus gas stations). They protested the legislation would place unfair burdens on businesses that sell food and drinks that aren’t displayed on a centralized menu board, such as gas stations that may have multiple drink stations where customers can get self-serve sodas, frozen drinks, or coffee.

A number of chains, including McDonald’s and Starbucks, had already put menu labeling into effect in recent years in anticipation of the new guidelines.

Arguably one reason a lot of restaurant food tastes so good is because it’s full of fat and salt — and no restaurant wants to broadcast to its diners that they’re serving 2,000 calorie salads or 1,200 calorie milkshakes. However, In light of the global epidemics of obesity and diabetes, some believe it’s simply irresponsible for restaurants to serve burgers with more calories than an average adult human needs in a day, or lattes that have more sugar than a chocolate bar.

Whether displaying nutritional information on menus actually causes consumers to make healthier choices or not is still up for debate: Some studies indicated that calorie counts on menus don’t ahave much of an effect on what people order — but they may be somewhat effective in encouraging the restaurants themselves to offer lower-calorie foods. However, many worry about nutritional data, like eating the ‘right calories’, not eating gluten products etc.

Food establishments are free to choose the services of qualified professionals or compute the caloric value of ingredients by using third-party software. It is likely there will be a future requirement to add additional nutritional information to help customers to make informed, healthy eating choices.

If you are seeking a specialist solution to provide and manage and compute nutritional information then contact us on 097143365589

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